The Impact of Military Strategy and Armament Policy from the Nazi Period on the Berlin Area

Associated PhD project

This work analyses the impact of military strategy and armament policy from the Nazi period. Specifically, it analyses the repercussions of these policies beyond the capital of Berlin and examines the effects of these policies on the greater metropolitan area. How did rearmament, the arms industry and the war economy, as well as the course of the war, shape the Berlin area? Which social developments emerged from these processes and how deeply did they shape the region?

From the end of the nineteenth century, troops, barracks and installations for research into and the testing of armaments were established in the region surrounding Berlin. This military infrastructure, however, was to be drastically reduced under the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles. This reduction, and the formation of ‘Greater Berlin’ in 1920, deprived the surrounding areas of considerable economic power and tax revenue.

After 1933, regional participation in the economic power of the metropolis – and specifically in its reconstruction and re-armament for war – seemed to be a logical way out of the economic crisis that had been escalating since 1919/20. This project will examine the extent to which this ‘provincial’ calculation has had long-term social, economic and political consequences for the region.

Silvio Fischer

Leibniz Centre for Contemporary History
Am Neuen Markt 1
14467 Potsdam

Email: fischer [at] zzf-potsdam.de

Forschung

The Impact of Military Strategy and Armament Policy from the Nazi Period on the Berlin Area

Associated PhD project

This work analyses the impact of military strategy and armament policy from the Nazi period. Specifically, it analyses the repercussions of these policies beyond the capital of Berlin and examines the effects of these policies on the greater metropolitan area. How did rearmament, the arms industry and the war economy, as well as the course of the war, shape the Berlin area? Which social developments emerged from these processes and how deeply did they shape the region?

From the end of the nineteenth century, troops, barracks and installations for research into and the testing of armaments were established in the region surrounding Berlin. This military infrastructure, however, was to be drastically reduced under the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles. This reduction, and the formation of ‘Greater Berlin’ in 1920, deprived the surrounding areas of considerable economic power and tax revenue.

After 1933, regional participation in the economic power of the metropolis – and specifically in its reconstruction and re-armament for war – seemed to be a logical way out of the economic crisis that had been escalating since 1919/20. This project will examine the extent to which this ‘provincial’ calculation has had long-term social, economic and political consequences for the region.

Silvio Fischer

Leibniz Centre for Contemporary History
Am Neuen Markt 1
14467 Potsdam

Email: fischer [at] zzf-potsdam.de

Forschung