Transformation Processes in the World of Labour

This section analyses industrial production regimes of modernity as social orders from a synchronous and diachronic perspective. The individual research projects examine social consequences of the changes in the world of work in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Forschung

Projekte

The first Ford Taunus leaves the assembly line in Cologne, 23. November 1948. Photo: Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-2005-0722-512 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, Bundesarchiv Bild 183-2005-0722-512, Köln, Erster Ford Taunus läuft vom Fließband., CC BY-SA 3.0 DE

Fordism as a Keyword of the Twentieth Century

Rüdiger Hachtmann (Senior Fellow)
Book project

The target of this project is a monograph entitled ‘The Fordist Century’. The study will focus on Germany, including perspectives on global and international developments (besides the USA, particularly Japan, the USSR, Italy and Sweden [post-Fordist Volvo system]).

Screenshot of the website wandel-der-arbeit.de, BArch, Bild-F040741-0020 / Lothar Schaack

Social Consequences of the Transformation of the World of Work in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century

Frank Bösch, Winfried Süß

Postgraduate Research Group of the Hans Böckler Foundation

During the second half of the twentieth century, technological and economic changes such as digitalisation and automatisation of production processes, globalisation and the expansion of the service sector have induced fundamental changes in the world of labour.

Women in movement. Women Migrants of Turkish Origin in the Federal Republic of Germany and Democratisation in Turkey (1961 to 1990)

Elisabeth Kimmerle

PhD project
Project leader at ZZF: Frank Bösch

In Turkey, democratisation has been negotiated on the question of what rights women should have since the foundation of the republic. These rights were granted in a limited way from above, but were also fought for from below. After the 1980 military coup, the feminist movement was one of the first opposition groups to contribute to democratisation as a grassroots movement. This dissertation project examines the transformation of Turkish society from the 1960s to the 1980s from a transnational and gender-historical perspective. It poses the question of how the international experiences of female migrant workers since the 1960s, especially after Germany, have affected Turkish society and what role female migrant workers of Turkish origin played as transnational actors in processes of social change.

Transformation Processes in the World of Labour

This section analyses industrial production regimes of modernity as social orders from a synchronous and diachronic perspective. The individual research projects examine social consequences of the changes in the world of work in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Forschung

Projekte

The first Ford Taunus leaves the assembly line in Cologne, 23. November 1948. Photo: Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-2005-0722-512 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, Bundesarchiv Bild 183-2005-0722-512, Köln, Erster Ford Taunus läuft vom Fließband., CC BY-SA 3.0 DE

Fordism as a Keyword of the Twentieth Century

Rüdiger Hachtmann (Senior Fellow)
Book project

The target of this project is a monograph entitled ‘The Fordist Century’. The study will focus on Germany, including perspectives on global and international developments (besides the USA, particularly Japan, the USSR, Italy and Sweden [post-Fordist Volvo system]).

Screenshot of the website wandel-der-arbeit.de, BArch, Bild-F040741-0020 / Lothar Schaack

Social Consequences of the Transformation of the World of Work in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century

Frank Bösch, Winfried Süß

Postgraduate Research Group of the Hans Böckler Foundation

During the second half of the twentieth century, technological and economic changes such as digitalisation and automatisation of production processes, globalisation and the expansion of the service sector have induced fundamental changes in the world of labour.

Women in movement. Women Migrants of Turkish Origin in the Federal Republic of Germany and Democratisation in Turkey (1961 to 1990)

Elisabeth Kimmerle

PhD project
Project leader at ZZF: Frank Bösch

In Turkey, democratisation has been negotiated on the question of what rights women should have since the foundation of the republic. These rights were granted in a limited way from above, but were also fought for from below. After the 1980 military coup, the feminist movement was one of the first opposition groups to contribute to democratisation as a grassroots movement. This dissertation project examines the transformation of Turkish society from the 1960s to the 1980s from a transnational and gender-historical perspective. It poses the question of how the international experiences of female migrant workers since the 1960s, especially after Germany, have affected Turkish society and what role female migrant workers of Turkish origin played as transnational actors in processes of social change.