Leibniz Research Alliance ‘Historical Authenticity’

Today, more than ever before, attitudes to the past are characterised by an intense striving for historical authenticity. In practical terms this manifests itself, for example, in the value attached to "authentic objects" in museums, collections and archives or to "authentic places" - be they historic buildings, urban architectural ensembles or memorial sites as apparently direct embodiments of history. This desire for historical authenticity and past "reality" goes hand in hand with an attachment to "tradition" and a longing to experience history "first hand". Ultimately, this is all bound up with a desire for things regarded as "genuine", with a wish to reconstruct and preserve the "true" and "original".

The Leibniz Research Alliance Historical Authenticity seeks to explore how contemporary conceptions of authenticity affect the way we deal with our cultural heritage by examining the reconstruction and conservation of historical artefacts, by studying the function of language as a cultural repository and instrument, by tracing the development of school textbooks and maps, and looking at the conception of museums, archives, monuments and memorial sites.

The Leibniz Research Alliance Historical Authenticity is a cooperation of historical, educational, social sciences and spatial research institutes as well as research museums. It will take a transdisciplinary and international approach, drawing on the full range of competence and expertise offered by cultural studies and by the social and life sciences at the participating research museums and institutes. Nineteen Leibniz institutes and three external partners are currently involved.

Website Leibniz Research Alliance "Historical Authenticity"

Speaker of the Leibniz-Research Alliance "Historical Authenticity": Prof. Dr. Martin Sabrow
Cordinator of the Leibniz-Research Alliance "Historical Authenticity": Dr. Achim Saupe

Forschung

Projekte

Guided tour in Berlin, Mainzer Str., Photo: Christine Bartlitz

Public History and Historical Tourism

Hanno Hochmuth

Research project in the framework of the Leibniz Research Alliance ‘Historical Authenticity’

Berlin is regarded as ‘the Rome of the contemporary period’. The varied history of the German capital contributes to a great extent to Berlin’s constantly growing appeal in global...

Zeitlandschaften des Sozialismus

Katja Stopka

Vorbereitung eines Forschungsvorhabens (zusammen mit Michael Ostheimer) mit dem Titel
"Zeitlandschaften des Sozialismus. Ästhetisch-politische Streifzüge durch die bildende Kunst, den Film, die Fotographie und...

A reconstruction of 1945 destroyed and demolished in GDR times Schlossbau serves today as the seat of the Landtag Brandenburg, photo: pixabay

Public spaces as places of (re)negotiating historicity and belonging

Kristin Meißner

HERA-Projekt en/counter/points
The ZZF subproject examines postsocialist, postmigrant and postcolonial historical and authenticity conflicts encompassing the debates about the new palaces in Berlin and Potsdam and the transformation of both cities after 1989.

Leibniz Research Alliance ‘Historical Authenticity’

Today, more than ever before, attitudes to the past are characterised by an intense striving for historical authenticity. In practical terms this manifests itself, for example, in the value attached to "authentic objects" in museums, collections and archives or to "authentic places" - be they historic buildings, urban architectural ensembles or memorial sites as apparently direct embodiments of history. This desire for historical authenticity and past "reality" goes hand in hand with an attachment to "tradition" and a longing to experience history "first hand". Ultimately, this is all bound up with a desire for things regarded as "genuine", with a wish to reconstruct and preserve the "true" and "original".

The Leibniz Research Alliance Historical Authenticity seeks to explore how contemporary conceptions of authenticity affect the way we deal with our cultural heritage by examining the reconstruction and conservation of historical artefacts, by studying the function of language as a cultural repository and instrument, by tracing the development of school textbooks and maps, and looking at the conception of museums, archives, monuments and memorial sites.

The Leibniz Research Alliance Historical Authenticity is a cooperation of historical, educational, social sciences and spatial research institutes as well as research museums. It will take a transdisciplinary and international approach, drawing on the full range of competence and expertise offered by cultural studies and by the social and life sciences at the participating research museums and institutes. Nineteen Leibniz institutes and three external partners are currently involved.

Website Leibniz Research Alliance "Historical Authenticity"

Speaker of the Leibniz-Research Alliance "Historical Authenticity": Prof. Dr. Martin Sabrow
Cordinator of the Leibniz-Research Alliance "Historical Authenticity": Dr. Achim Saupe

Forschung

Projekte

Guided tour in Berlin, Mainzer Str., Photo: Christine Bartlitz

Public History and Historical Tourism

Hanno Hochmuth

Research project in the framework of the Leibniz Research Alliance ‘Historical Authenticity’

Berlin is regarded as ‘the Rome of the contemporary period’. The varied history of the German capital contributes to a great extent to Berlin’s constantly growing appeal in global...

Zeitlandschaften des Sozialismus

Katja Stopka

Vorbereitung eines Forschungsvorhabens (zusammen mit Michael Ostheimer) mit dem Titel
"Zeitlandschaften des Sozialismus. Ästhetisch-politische Streifzüge durch die bildende Kunst, den Film, die Fotographie und...

A reconstruction of 1945 destroyed and demolished in GDR times Schlossbau serves today as the seat of the Landtag Brandenburg, photo: pixabay

Public spaces as places of (re)negotiating historicity and belonging

Kristin Meißner

HERA-Projekt en/counter/points
The ZZF subproject examines postsocialist, postmigrant and postcolonial historical and authenticity conflicts encompassing the debates about the new palaces in Berlin and Potsdam and the transformation of both cities after 1989.